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Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention

Idaho Underage Drinking Prevention Program

DaNae Schoenborn, MHS
Health Education Specialist Senior
Partnership for Success Project Coordinator
dschoenborn@eiph.idaho.gov
(208) 533-3158

Talk.Listen.Engage.
Let's help them make good choices.

Research suggests children who feel close to their parents
are less likely to drink. Fifteen minutes of one-on-one time together each day is a way to help your child with the day to day challenges they face. The 30-Day Parent Challenge has a list of ideas to engage your child/children daily. Download the 30-Day Parent Challenge here.

Idaho’s BeTheParents.org has resources to help you understand the warning signs of underage drinking, how to talk to your children about alcohol, and evidence-based research that shows some of the consequences of underage drinking (including unplanned and unwanted sexual activity, brain impairment, and even death).

Click below to learn more about underage drinking:

If your teen is currently drinking here are some resources:

Drug Overdose Prevention Program

Mallory Johnson
Health Education Specialist Senior
Drug Overdose Prevention Program Coordinator
mjohnson@eiph.idaho.gov
(208) 533-3221

Opioid misuse is a problem in our community. If you or someone you know is misusing opioid pain killers or illegal drugs like heroin or fentanyl, call 211 to get help or visit 211.idaho.gov.

From 2014-2018, 152 people died in our region due to a drug overdose.

Table 1. Number of drug overdose deaths by county of residence and year: Idaho residents, 2014-2018a

 
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
Total
Rateb
Bonneville
23
31
25
19
21
119
21.2
Clark
-
-
1
1
-
2
45.6
Custer
1
-
-
1
1
3
14.5
Fremont
-
1
2
2
-
5
7.7
Jefferson
-
2
2
1
2
7
5
Lemhi
1
3
-
-
1
5
12.8
Madison
2
2
1
1
-
6
3.1
Teton
1
-
2
1
1
5
9
District Total
28
39
33
26
26
152
14.1

aDrug Overdose Deaths: Idaho Residents, 2014-2018, Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, Division of Public Health, Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics, December 2019.
bFive year rate: number of deaths per 100,000 population

What are Opioids?

Do you know what’s in your medicine cabinet or drawer? Opioids come in many different forms from the pharmacy including syrups, pills, and patches. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about the medications you’re taking.

Opioid pain medication is addictive. Make sure you’re taking the medicine as prescribed. Talk with your doctor about getting the correct dose and available alternative treatment options.

Store opioid medication in a safe place: out of sight and out of reach of visitors.

Dispose of Unused Medication

Unused prescription medications left in the medicine cabinet may be taken or misused by others. Dispose of all unused medicine. Click here for instructions.

Organization and Community Member Resources

Opioid Education and Naloxone Training
Eastern Idaho Public Health provides information and presentations to community members and organizations about the current state of opioid use in Idaho, safe use and disposal of prescription opioids, illicit opioids, overdose risk and reversal, and Idaho’s Good Samaritan Law. Presentations include overdose recognition and demonstrations of nasal naloxone.

Call Jodie Powell at (208) 533-3161 for details.

Get Naloxone (also known as Narcan®)
On July 1, 2015, Idaho’s law allowing easier access to naloxone went into effect. Since that time, significant progress has been made in educating prescribers and pharmacists about the new law and their roles in it. Many pharmacies are now stocking naloxone and prescribers and pharmacists are becoming more knowledgeable and comfortable recommending and dispensing the medication. The next step is getting this life-saving drug into the hands of those who are in a position to assist a person at risk of experiencing an opioid-related overdose. Nasal naloxone is available through a mini grant supervised by the Idaho Office of Drug Policy (ODP). Law enforcement and EMS can receive naloxone to be carried by their personnel. Community organizations or medical providers can distribute naloxone to clients and patients who are at risk of an overdose.

Naloxone for Organizations
Naloxone is available at no cost through a mini grant from the Idaho Office of Drug Policy. Shaina Cales at the ODP can answer any question you have: shaina.cales@odp.idaho.gov or (208) 854-3042. The application can be found here. EIPH has data available to help you fill out the application. Contact Jodie at 208-533-3161.

Naloxone for Individuals
Soldiers of Hope will provide Naloxone to individuals free of charge. If interested, please contact Kathy Chin at (208) 357-6220.

For more information about opioids, please visit:


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