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Smoking and Pregnancy

Smoking during pregnancy can increase your risk of complications. Tobacco smoke is harmful for you and your baby before and after birth. These complications include:

Miscarriages

Decreased oxygen to the fetus



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Tissue damage to the lungs and/or brain

Premature delivery- which is the leading cause of death, disability and disease among newborns

Lower birth weight

3 times more likely to die from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)

Baby develops weaker lungs and have increased risk for many associated health problems

Studies show link between smoking during pregnancy and cleft lip and cleft palate.

The optimal time to quit smoking is before you get pregnant. However, quitting at any time during your pregnancy can help your baby get a healthier start at life. It is important to talk with your physician to discuss ways for you to quit while you are pregnant or trying to become pregnant. The benefits of quitting smoking during pregnancy or before becoming pregnant include:

Baby receives more oxygen even after the first day of no smoking.

Baby will grow better and healthier.

Decreases chance of delivering too early.

You will have more energy.

You can breathe more easily.

You will have a better chance of having your baby come home with you from the hospital.

Decreases chances for developing heart disease, stroke, lung cancer, lung disease, and other smoking-related diseases.

Have more time to spend with your baby and other loved ones.

Save more money for diapers formula, or family vacations.

Food will taste better.

Clothes, hair and home will smell better.

More likely to live and know your grandchildren.

For more information on quitting smoking during pregnancy:

Before Your Baby is Born

Quitting for Two

Helping Someone Quit

Pregnancy and Motherhood

Idaho QuitLine: 1-800-784-8669

EIPH Tobacco Cessation Support Groups

 

 

Information taken from, https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/basic_information/health_effects/pregnancy/

 

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